LGBT Estate Planning

Maryland Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual
& Transgender Estate Planning

500 E Pratt St, Suite 900, Baltimore, MD 21202-3133 • 410.332.8626 • info@mdlgbtestateplanning.com

Estate
Planning

An estate plan is more than a will. It’s a comprehensive strategy for protecting yourself and those you care about.

learn more

Trusts

Provide for your children, avoid estate taxes, or help someone with special needs using this versatile planning tool.

learn more

Same-Sex
Marriage

Married gay and lesbian couples now enjoy many legal benefits. Find out which ones may apply to you.

learn more

Estate Administration

Settling an estate can be a daunting task. Learn what’s involved and how a probate attorney can help.

learn more

Featured Article

How To Disinherit Your Disapproving Relatives

By Lee Carpenter

Fans of the comic strip Peanuts might remember a panel in which Patty and Violet are planning a party.

“Let’s not invite Charlie Brown,” Patty says.

“OK, we won’t invite Charlie Brown,” Violet replies.

“And let’s not invite Lucy,” Patty continues.

“Fine. We won’t invite Lucy,” Violet agrees.

Then, looking up from her list, Patty exclaims, “It’s a lot more fun not inviting people than it is inviting them!”

The impulse that prompted Patty’s remark can also apply when writing a will. The crazy aunt who makes homophobic remarks? She’s out. The estranged brother who refused to attend your gay wedding? He gets nothing.

All joking aside, deciding who should inherit from you requires careful thought. The most important people in your life should of course top the list. Your partner or spouse, your children, or anyone you hold dear ought to be remembered in your estate plan.

But what about those people you specifically don’t want to attend the party? The best way to keep your assets out of their hands is to have a current estate plan in place. At a minimum, this would include a will or trust, a durable power of attorney, and an advance medical directive. If you don’t have a will, your disapproving relatives might inherit from you under the laws of “intestacy.”

Your will or trust should specifically mention the people you wish to disinherit. Including their names will make it clear that they were intentionally omitted and not simply overlooked.

About Us

  • Lee Carpenter
    Lee Carpenter is a Maryland attorney whose practice focuses on estate planning and administration, trusts, and general business and corporate law. His estate-planning work includes a special emphasis on the unique needs of same-sex couples… More
  • Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr LLP
    The Best of Both Worlds Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr LLP is a full-service law firm that offers you the national reach and sophisticated experience of a large firm and the local connections and value of a boutique firm. This combination of reach and… More

Protect What Matters

Your estate is too important to leave to chance. Choose an attorney who understands your needs on a personal level, and protect the people you care about most.

We have trusted Lee with our estate-planning needs for many years—first as partners and now as a married couple. He’s a great lawyer, and a real pleasure to work with.

T.S. and R.L.

Web Resources

Lamba Legal

A civil rights organization that focuses on the LGBT commnunity.

The Human Rights Campaign

A national LBGT Lobbying and Civil Rights advocacy organization.

More Web Resources